Home Forums GuitarPCB Build Support Animal G2 problem

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5765
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hello Barry, I jsut finished to build Animal G2, but something does not work, in bypass mode when the effect is not engaged I can hear the sound and the signal,but when I switch on the pedal there is no sound at all

    enclosed some picture, what could be gone wrong?

     

    thanks

    Angelo

    #5766
    Barry
    Keymaster

    Hard to see but your 3PDT I pad does not look like it is going to the Jack Tip but instead the battery lug connection (Ring). Connect it to Tip.

    #5769
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    done Barry but still not working, there is no signal when the pedal is engaged, is there something that I can check with Multimeter?

    #5771
    Cybercow
    Moderator

    Do you have and know how to use an audio probe? If you have no audio probe, they are very simple to make and it would be a surprise if you don’t already possess the materials to make one. Just Google search on how to make an audio probe.There are a number of different audio probes and different ways of using them. An audio probe can be dead-nuts simple to awesomely complex. I personally prefer the simplest of them to reduce the potential for introducing other issues.

    Before using an audio probe, I always FIRST double\triple check my wiring and voltage supplies to all the active components.

    The easiest audio probe is simply use a 100nF to 1µF 100v non-polar cap with 6” hook-up wire attached to each end. One end has an alligator clip, the other end is simply bared, tinned and bent to form a tiny hook. (It does not require a ground because with the type of probe and the method of using it depends on the enclosure and circuit to provide the ground. I would never use this type of probe in servicing an amplifier.) With this type of audio probe, I first apply a signal to the input of the pedal in question and connect the pedal’s output to a small amp. I then attach the alligator clip of the probe to the tip of the output jack of the pedal. I use the other end to start at the input of the pedal and verify signal throughout the signal path as I work my way towards the output. Applying the probe from the input to the output should always give an output to the amp. If it does not, double check the audio probe wiring. With a clear signal going thru the probe from the pedal’s input to the output, I then check the output of the pedals’ first stage. If the signal goes away, the problem is in the first stage. If there is good signal at the output of the first stage, I then proceed to the next stage. This process is simply rinsed and repeated till I get all the way through the circuit or find the spot where the signal fails. And depending on the circuit, just because I get to the point where the signal fails, does not necessarily mean the previous stage I’m testing is ‘bad’ – it might be the next stage sucking it down. It’s a process.

    #5772
    Barry
    Keymaster

    We have many guides including one to use your digital multimeter to check over the entire circuit using continuity. Hi highly suggest doing that while checking against the entire wiring guide I gave you above to look for additional wiring errors. We also have guides to using and building an audio probe to check the circuit for issues. All the guides are located on our Guides Page

    #5839
    wilkie1
    Moderator

    All good advice above.  I would like to add that you can remove the transistors (Thank you for using sockets!), and then do a thorough resolder of all joints including jacks and pots.  Replace the transistors and test again.  You may have a bad solder joint that is the culprit.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.