Home Forums Show Off Your Build A mash up of two classic Cornish style pedals

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  • #2155
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    Hey Gang, sorry I haven’t been more active.  Here’s a recent pedal I built for my own collection.  This is a repeat of a pedal I built for a friend last year.

    This pedal is a mash up of two fantastic pedals, the Super Sonic 02 and the G-02 Animal  on a Buff N’ Blend.  What a great combination and the buff n’ blend makes the Animal a very versatile circuit.  Add to that the Easy Order switch giving the ability to change which pedal comes first makes for one great sounding tip of the hat to Mr. Gilmour.

    I call it the scream and I highly recommend this combo.

    Gut

    Enjoy,

    -Scott

    #2156
    Barry
    Keymaster

    Thank you for sharing. I love to see people create their own unique takes on circuits instead of the same ‘ole if you get me. There is so much more you can do when making great combos that work. So many more tonal options as well as saving pedal board real estate. By adding our Easy Order switch board & Buff N Blend you have really made this a unique and versatile circuit dare I say way more value above and beyond the original $2k worth of circuits.

    Thanks again for sharing and really putting the Do It Yourself into DIY!

    #2158
    Cybercow
    Moderator

    Scott – way cool. Love to hear a demo when\if you make one.

    #2159
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    The Animal is interesting and can be a bit dark, but if I keep the tone all the way up and crank my pickups I get plenty of top end and bite.  I don’t always want my pickups all the way (I tend to play them around 7), so I use the buff and blend to dial in some of the clean sound (adding in a little top).  It works really well on single coils and provides a lot more sound options.  The SS is just a great sounding beast.  I’m using it in more of my combo builds. I had a long run with the mini-Zenith in combos which is great.  Now I’m digging the Super Sonic too.

     

    #2160
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    Thanks Mark.  I really need to step up and figure out how to do post a demo file.  I seem to remember you working on your demo rig.  How’s that going?

     

    #2161
    Barry
    Keymaster

    Thanks Mark. I really need to step up and figure out how to do post a demo file. I seem to remember you working on your demo rig. How’s that going?

    If you are needing a quiet place to make demos then I suggest a device like the Hughes and Kettner Red Box 5. It is one of the best Direct Boxes I have heard. My Tubmeister amp had one built in. If you record an audio file, etc.. and want to pass it along I can help get it posted.

    #2162
    Cybercow
    Moderator

    Scott – to be honest, it’s going slow. So many circuits-n-pedals. I feel like a kid in a candy store. Slowly but surely. I’ve got the gear and software to do a demo, just need to finish a few more pedals and set up a video session. Thanks for the nudge.

    #2163
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    Barry, my issue isn’t sound level, it is knowing what to play and how best to demonstrate the pedal.  I tend to play the same things when I test all my pedals.  You do a great job of demonstrating the strengths of a pedal because:

    A) you know the pedals well
    B) you play guitar well

    I’m learning how the different pedals work as I use them and I’m learning guitar as I test pedals.  For the first year of pedal building I used to joke about how they all sound the same.  Well, really the joke was on me.  They all sounded the same because I was playing them all the same.  I tend to like really clean sounds with just a little distortion to warm up the sound.  So I’d build a rat deluxe pedal and then try to set it up to have just a touch of distortion (which is possible), or I’d build a plexi-plus (love that pedal) and dial in a touch of distortion (which sounds good).  That approach along with limited playing skills tends to make every pedal sound the same.  I took some time off from building to actually play with the pedals I have and to use them in different combinations.  That has also help educate my ears to the differences.  Anyway, I need to step up and figure out how to demo.

    We could do this another way, you could send me dry signal of you playing “Gilmour” style parts and I could reamp them into the pedals and record the output and send the output back to you.

    -Scott

     

    #2164
    Barry
    Keymaster

    I actually do not think you have to be a “good player” per say but doing a quality sound demo is important.
    While there are many ways to do a demo and believe me I have received plenty of criticism over 9+ years the biggest mistake I see IMHO is too many people room micing or using inferior mics especially when they cannot turn the volume to an appropriate level. You end up hearing the guitar pick hitting the strings while broadcasting an inferior version of the room sound.

    That said you can get a Shure SM57 used on eBay or any one of its “workalikes” for $20ish.
    Then close mic the speaker to prevent hearing ambient room sounds and a plastic pick hitting the strings. Remember the “garbage in, garbage out” philosophy.

    You can simply strum very accurate 3 related chords like G, C & D repeatedly while turning a few knobs. You can then add some simple riffs which may consist of 3-5 notes. I personally find more inspiration while playing to a backing track that I create myself using Sony Acid Pro which you can get on Humble Bundle from time to time for like $15 plus a lot of Loops and other software. The loops are recorded live instruments that you simply drop and drag onto a timeline. Then open a new track below it and Drag & Drop another instrument till you get something you like. Very easy and Pro sounding once you get the hang of it.

    The obvious alternative to creating a backing track is to just download one. I use “This Site” so that once I purchase a track I can then edit for whatever backing instrumentation I desire as many different ways or times as I like or even change the pitch. (Nice feature)

    Once I have a backing track I like I may record one guitar and stop or layer multiple guitars to show off other features. I will usually play for 10 minutes or more and then pick the best 1:30 of it for the video demo. I noticed using analytics that for most demos people only have the attention span for that long on average. Once I have my song ready I grab a few fun background videos (sometimes blending them in and out) and use Cyberlink Power Director (also available from Humble Bundle) from time to time for an amazing price. Cyberlink is a bit higher of a learning curve but you can drag and drop your audio into it and do the same with any video backgrounds. You can then finish it all up with some Text to get your point across without worrying about poor voice audio. Finally nobody has to look at me (which suits me) while I am playing.

    After years of experimenting that is my process for the last 2+ years.
    Obviously you do not need to do everything I said but even if a few parts help then that is good.

    I hope that helps.

    #2165
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    Thanks Barry, that helps a ton.  I’m determined to get some examples ready.

    -Scott

    #2168
    Billy
    Moderator

    Great looking pedal I like it looks fantastic inside and out

    #2228
    Matt
    Participant

    If it helps at all, my trick for demoing pedals is a looper pedal. Figure out a riff or progression and play it through the looper and then into the pedal. Now you have your hands free with your guitar playing coming through your rig and you can turn the gain up, delay settings, modulation- whatever.

    #3250
    Leebob
    Participant

    Scott, I had just emailed Barry about doing this very combination (Animal + Super Sonic + Easy Order Switcher)…and there it was basically in the forum (DUH)…What size enclosure did you use?  Looks like the double sized…any recommendations, cautions, concerns?  Looks like I’ll be sourcing parts for “Scream’s Brother-in-law”! – Leebob

    #3262
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    That is a very cool looking pedal. I am hoping my paint job satisfies me as much as that one would. I am still trying to figure out how to best label my knobs, since I don’t really have access to inkjet printers for creating water slide decals. Barry should start selling decal sets in his store, I’d purchase some (basic words like VOL, TONE, PRES, etc) just so I didn’t have to go find a buddy with an inkjet.  I’ll probably end up with just sharpie under the clear coat.

    Leebob, you may have found your answer elsewhere, but most double pedal combos fit in a 1590BB enclosure without issue. The orientation of the boards can sometimes get challenging, for instance, if you use the PCB-mounted pots, you kinda lock your board into a location relative to the pots, and with some other boards like the order switcher, I wanted to orient it in portrait rather than landscape, but the plugs and jacks I selected wouldn’t allow it, so you just have to get creative and mark everything out before you start drilling holes. Not rocket science, but it takes a little planning.

    #3263
    Scott Preston
    Participant

    This version of Scream is in a 1509BB, it is tight but it fits.  I’ve also built this combo into a 1509BBS which is a little easier to assemble.

     

    #3266
    Leebob
    Participant

    Thanks for the info Scott (and Michael)…Would you believe I recognize your avatar?  I think I’ll play it safe and choose the larger enclosure…I have the same issues about labeling Michael mentions…I think Barry mentioned elsewhere about using enclosure mounted pots and then placing them in such a way to allow for easy access and modification…I’m pretty sure additional futzing will be required…

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